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Interested in commenting on the new Catherine and Isiah Leggett Math and Science Building? Join the conversation by leaving a comment in the “Leave a Reply” section below.

This Post Has 43 Comments

  1. This Comment belongs right after the Responder’s reply of March 18, 2021. I was unable to enter it there for unknown reasons.

    Hi Brad, May you say who the Responder is? I can understand that the new Architecture plans called for removing the old light poles, but cannot understand why working in the City property and the grove of trees would not require tree protection measures, especially since heavy equipment was needed. To quote the Responder; “They had to use a piece of equipment because the concrete bases supporting the [light} poles required significant effort to remove.” If BMC thought they did nothing wrong, why did they agree to have their tree company mitigate damage to the impacted trees and their CRZs with special treatments? The light poles should have been removed from inside the temporary construction fence.
    It is ironic the Responder’s comment “There is no anticipated future need to operate in that area for the remainder of the project,” when BMC is already working again in the City property and grove. Thank you.

    1. In regards to the trench you mention, BMC has been coordinating with Comcast for temporary internet service for the current field office. The intent was for Comcast to run underground from the South side of Takoma Ave. towards the jobsite. Once within the jobsite, BMC requested that they run overhead using BMC temporary light poles. BMC requested Comcast contact BMC prior to performing work, so they could walk the site identify the routing, and agree to the process, since they are not a BMC subcontractor. Comcast was unable to satisfy that request and began digging test pits without notification. Comcast is responsible for coordinating any activities in the Public Right of Way as a public utility company. BMC is continuing to coordinate with their teams to request improved communication and notification for future utility work.

  2. Hi Brad, I noticed that last week MC or BMC fenced off part of TP City property where most of the trees are located in an area you refer to as “the park-like area at the corner of Takoma and Fenton.”
    I see tire tracks and about 10 areas of ground disturbances where either a small trench or hole was dug, that roughly follows a broken or dashed, in this case, painted white line, that usually indicates some type of buried utility line. The ground disturbances and white line starts at a power pole in front of 7607 Takoma Ave. and continues through the City property where they enter the BMC construction site at the north end of the City grove by the large White Pine. The tire tracks run a few feet from a small caliper Cherry street tree and a very large Willow Oak at the Takoma Ave. and south end of the City property.
    I hope the City and City arborist were notified of this work activity outside of the construction fence and LOD stakes. Thank you!

    1. Hi Brad, I was informed that this new incursion into City property was again without City permission nor tree root protection. Apparently a BMC subcontractor installed an underground cable for wired internet service to BMC’s construction trailer, running under or next to 4 City trees. BMC would like to hold Comcast accountable for not running the cable aerially, but they are ultimately responsible for supervising their subcontractors. How could they not notice the work going on just outside their construction fence and LOD stakes especially after they ordered service? Please add these 4 impacted trees to all those scheduled for treatment from your arborist for mitigation for illegal entry into the City grove to remove the 3 light poles. That should have been done from BMC’s demolition side of the fence. Thank you.

      1. Thank you for raising this concern. The grove of trees is property of the City of Takoma Park but for many years has been maintained as a courtesy by the College. Campus Grounds personnel drive Kubotas to that area to transport supplies and equipment required for maintaining the landscape. The vehicles have soft tires and are designed to be driven over landscapes without damaging them. Any risks of damage to tree roots is minimal or non-existent. They generally leave no tire marks, except for when the ground is wet. The tire tracks and the excavation activities are not related.

        In regards to the trench you mention, BMC asked Comcast to provide temporary internet service for the current field office. BMC has made numerous attempts to coordinate the installation with Comcast. BMC had hoped Comcast would place cables underground from the South side of Takoma Aveune towards the jobsite. Once within the jobsite area, BMC requested that they run overhead using our temporary light poles. BMC requested that Comcast contact them prior to performing work, so we could walk again as a team, identify the routing, and agree to the process. Comcast was unable to satisfy that request and began digging test pits without notification to the College and apparently the City. Comcast is responsible for coordinating their activities in the public rights of way with local governments. BMC has alerted the City of Takoma Park and will continue to coordinate with Comcast to request improved communication and notification for future utility work.

  3. Hi Brad, We now know from the MC email and Project Update Forum the answer to my comment of Feb 24th, that the huge plume of dust rising from the demo site was from the unexpected and premature collapse of the roof and some walls of Falcon Hall as it was being demolished. Will there be a report issued about this and if so will it be made public? Will BMC be fined or given a citation? Considering the dust rising from the site, I noticed yesterday 3/3/21 three heavy equipment “claws” raking the collapsed Falcon Hall down to the ground, but only one worker watering the rising dust with what looked like a garden hose in only one area. Is that the “mister” we heard about? A fire hose would be a better choice. Today the same. One water worker in the same area trying to keep pace with the rising dust from several demolition machines. More or larger hoses would be helpful.

    1. Thank you for your many questions. We’ve referred the questions to Barton Malow for a response. We’ll get back to you when we have more thorough answers.

      Thanks.

      Brad Stewart
      Vice President and Provost

    2. Thank you for your comment. Yes, the dust you noticed was in response to the demolition sequence of Falcon Hall. This week, there have been two to three workers with hoses at any given time. They used two-inch hoses, which is the standard requirement for Fire Department connections. Construction best practices were used and will continue to be used for this process.

      We will provide additional information regarding the Falcon Hall demolition in our weekly Project Activity Update email. Moving forward, we will continue with our safety protocols and procedures as we work towards the completion of demolition.

      Thanks.

      Brad Stewart
      Vice President and Provost

  4. Hi Brad, Where you are working along Takoma Ave. in front of the Commons building, where there is no curtain on the construction fence, some of that fence still encroaches on the sidewalk. Please lay down wood chips on the exposed roots of the street trees along this area especially if more heavy equipment will run along there. That will have the benefit of widening the sidewalk and passageway with wood chip protection. I noticed 6 LOD stakes run over and uprooted in this area also.

    1. Thank you for your feedback. As we discussed last night at Project Update Forum, BMC will address the location of the fence and give consideration to your other suggestions.

      Thanks.

      Brad Stewart
      Vice President and Provost

  5. Hi Brad, What happened to the comment I posted yesterday or the day before about the sidewalk on Fenton that was ripped up rendering it impossible to get through for many users?

    1. Thanks again for your comment about the status of the construction entrances and pedestrian accessibility. We sent your note immediately to BMC.

      As we discussed at the Project Update Forum last night, these entrances are part of the county’s approval of the project. BMC is in the midst of working through the process to close the sidewalk on the East side of Fenton with the work on the entrances now complete.

      We do read your messages in a timely fashion and send them immediately to the responsible parties to take the appropriate action and ultimately provide a response to you.

      Thanks.

      Brad Stewart
      Vice President and Provost

    2. Thank you for this feedback. Our team is working with the City of Takoma Park to post the proper signage to close the sidewalk along Fenton Street.

      Thanks.

      Brad Stewart
      Vice President and Provost

  6. Hi Brad, I noticed the sidewalk along Fenton Ave. was removed in 2 places for construction entrances, and jagged rocks put in its place which force walkers into the street. It would be impossible for a wheel chair, walker, or stroller to pass. Is this the approved way of handling this situation?

    1. Thank you for this feedback. Our team is working with the City of Takoma Park to post the proper signage to close the sidewalk along Fenton Street.

      Thanks.

      Brad Stewart
      Vice President and Provost

  7. Hi Brad, You seem to be the one answering comments thank you. A huge plume of dust and smoke billowed up from the demolition of the north end of Falcon Hall today, Feb. 24, 2021, at about 8am. Was this supposed to happen this way? Looked like a fog bank spreading across the site and beyond. I took photos.

    1. Thank you for this comment. This was addressed during the March 2 Project Update Forum.

      We will provide additional information regarding Falcon Hall’s demolition in our weekly Project Activity Update email. Moving forward, we will continue with our safety protocols and procedures as we work towards the completion of demolition.

      Thanks.

      Brad Stewart
      Vice President and Provost

  8. Who is chewing up (and for what purpose) the critical root zones in the grove of trees on TP City property just outside the construction fence and LOD stakes at Fenton and Takoma Aves?

    1. Dear George,

      Thank you for your inquiry. It is our best guess that you saw BMC removing the existing light poles. The team used the smallest equipment appropriate to complete the removal of the light poles and minimize impacts on trees.

      The next step is to install temporary lighting during construction phase of the project. Ultimately, permanent light fixtures will be installed before the project is completed. All of this work will be completed in compliance with the project approvals and the tree protection plans.

      Thanks.

      Brad Stewart
      Vice President and Provost

      1. Hi Brad, You and BMC are outside the construction fence and LOD (limit of disturbance) stakes and into the City’s grove of trees. Why cant you open up the fence a little and work from your demolition/construction side, or at least protect the grove with root mats or woodchips and tree fences?

        1. Thank you for your feedback. Our team reviewed and has not been working in that area during the time frame you mentioned. We will continue to conduct activities in accordance with our tree protection plan. Should work in the area be required, although not anticipated, we will implement tree protection measures required by regulatory authorities.

          Thanks.

          Brad Stewart
          Vice President and Provost

          1. Hi Brad, Are you saying that BMC was not working in what they call, in their latest Project Activity Update, the “park-like area at the corner of Takoma Avenue and Fenton Street.” But in your 2/17/21 reply to my 2/15/21 inquiry you say “It is our best guess that you saw BMC removing the existing light poles.” I do not mention a time frame! Just the date after I noticed the 3 holes and heavy equipment tracks in this area which is outside the LOD stakes and in the City grove of trees and their roots, without tree protection measures. I would be glad to meet you on site to show you the disturbance. You name the time and date.

          2. Thank you for your feedback. The work that you noted on 2/15 was the removal of 3 existing light poles, permitted by the county and city. No tree protection measures were required by either authority for the conduct of that work. The tracks in the grass there are the same tracks that were made on 2/15. They had to use a piece of equipment because the concrete bases supporting the poles required significant effort to remove. There has been no new use of equipment in that area.

            Since 2/15, the construction team has not been operating in that area at all since they completed the work. There is no anticipated future need to operate in that area for the remainder of the project.

  9. I noticed construction LOD stakes across Takoma Ave. from the Commons in front of the private house at 7611 Takoma Ave. What is happening there? Will the city street tree next to the stakes be protected? Also, the construction fence recently erected along Takoma Ave. at the Commons encroaches on the sidewalk. Maybe add wood chips in this area to “widen” the sidewalk? Also, considering noise pollution from demolition and construction, there is a social cost for people passively enjoying Jesup Blair park just across the RR tracks. Also, would you please answer my Comment above posted on Nov. 14, 2020. Thank you.

    1. Hi George,

      Thank you for your inquiries. The tree you are referring to, across from Commons along Takoma Avenue, is being preserved. There is utility work, including a water line installation, near that tree, so stakes have been placed to show the Limit of Disturbance that will be in effect for the duration of that work. Tree protection fencing will be installed to ensure safety of the tree during this work. For more information about each specific tree, you can view the Tree Protection Plan and Tree Removal Plan, on the project website Resources page under Regulatory Permits and Reports.

      In regard to your previous comments on tree protection, we presented the plan for tree protection and removal for the Takoma Park Tree Commission and received their decision in September 2020. We recommend that you review their findings from the hearing, shared here on the project website.

      We appreciate your recommendation regarding the passageway between The Commons and Falcon Hall. The area that you are referring to has construction and tree protection fencing in that area and cannot be opened for the public. We encourage an alternative route along New York Ave., on the other side of the Commons building, to avoid walking near active construction activity.

  10. Stann’s Carderock Mica Schist Wall related to his lauded 60’s MC Science Bldg is glistening & luminous in the sun today!
    One new idea, when the time approaches for unique Wall to come down, & in preparation, if there is potential for removing a very few of the stones at that time, or a very small wall segment, they can simply be placed on the remaining Green Lawn, e.g., next to the Resource Center, immediately opposite to the Stann Science Bldg., that would be great! They thus would be available for a potential College Quadrangle or Garden! These intact stones will take care of themselves, no special treatment is needed! If hopefully feasible, thank you for considering this concept! Cheers! Marcie & George, 301-587-5955 “We are the exclusive quarriers of Carderock® Stone. This beautiful building stone is a mica-schist quartzite, with horizontal and vertical cleavage making it easy to work into numerous installation styles. The vibrant blues, browns, grays and greens create an aesthetically pleasing palette of colors for most any stone project.” Including landscaping! Quarried in Bethesda! http://www.carderock.com http://www.carderock.com/carderock-stone

    1. Hi Marcie,

      Thank you for this idea. As previously mentioned, we will dedicate space reserved in the new Leggett Building to commemorate the Stann 1960 Science South Building as promised, so the legacy of the building will be preserved.

      We’ve reviewed and analyzed options to add new design features to preserve the stone on the existing Science South building. Our consultants have prepared possible designs and unfortunately they are cost prohibitive. There are many challenges with leaving the stones on the grass in particular related to grounds maintenance. Scattered stones would be an obstruction to mowers and a potential safety hazard for people walking on grassy areas. Therefore, we will not be moving forward with a preservation design.

      Thank you again for your feedback. Let us know if you’d like to talk to a member of our team about this matter,

      Brad Stewart
      Vice President and Provost

  11. Noticed “LOD” construction stakes at the east end of the City triangular treed area adjacent to the parking lot entrance near Takoma and Fenton Aves. intersection. What is happening at this spot? One recently planted City street tree seems to be impacted. Will it be moved/replanted?

    FYI: Witnessed delivery of a 40 cubic yard roll-off dumpster in front of Falcon Hall before 7am start time, with attendant clanging, scraping, and beeping?

    1. Dear George,

      Thanks again for your inquiries. I appreciate your patience in waiting for a fuller reply. I wanted to get all the details given the importance of your questions.

      Regarding the trees along Takoma Avenue, the tree you may be concerned about is T-148. The protection strategy for this tree was revised in the field during site walkthrough for Erosion and Sediment Control and Tree Protection Plan compliance with the County, State, City, Barton Marlow Company (BMC) and their arborist, Carroll’s Tree Service, the demolition subcontractor, and the College. The approved tree protection plan called for boring under T148 to preserve this tree while installing the water line. You can see this strategy illustrated in the PowerPoint shared at the Tree Commission hearing. However, during the recent walkthrough to finalize the Tree Protection Plan, it was suggested that we temporarily lift the tree up out of the ground, temporarily relocate the tree, install the utilities, and then replant the tree. This strategy was agreed to be the less stressful of tree protection method for this tree. Several people on site had done this successfully in the past, and all agreed to this change of method, including Marty Fry, the new City of Takoma Park arborist. So, that tree will only temporarily be removed and it will be replanted in the same location.

      Thank you again for the inquiry about the dumpster delivery as it gave the College the opportunity to confirm compliance with the agreed upon operating parameters. We have reviewed the records and engaged both BMC’s senior project manager, Paul Grossman and Allen Turnbaugh, the site superintendent. The gates are not unlocked until 7am for site access by vendors, subcontractors and workers. Only a limited number of BMC supervisory personnel are allowed on site prior to 7am including the site superintendent. In advance of the delivery, BMC communicated clearly to the dumpster vendor that deliveries must only occur at 7am or later. The vendor acknowledged receipt of these directions. Records do not show a delivery before 7am.

      All the dumpsters were located on the project site within the construction fence along Fenton Street as described in the mobilization plan shared with the community. Some noise is generated when the containers are lifted and lowered. The noise levels were within in the noise ordinance. That said, BMC will continue to notify all parties throughout the project of noise management strategies for this project.

      Again, thanks for both your inquiries. We appreciate the opportunity to confirm our compliance with the Tree Protection Plan and the operating parameters of the project.

  12. Hello, What did the TP Tree Commission require or recommend for mitigation for removing approximately 60 regulated trees for the project? Were any good faith recommendations suggested by the neighbors considered, to improve stewardship of College trees?

    Please maintain the passage-way between The Commons and Falcon Hall during demolition and construction as you indicated you would.

  13. Please extend pavers to the sidewalk along Takoma Ave for the temporary access path between the Commons and Falcon Hall or cover the area with wood chips to protect the critical root zones of the trees from pedestrian traffic.

  14. We noticed a small grease or oil spill on the side walk at the entrance to the Falcon Hall parking lot at the Takoma Ave entrance where were parked some heavy construction equipment for several days. Some of this has washed away in the recent rains. Is this from the college project or PEPCO?

  15. Is the draft Tree Preservation plan ready at this time for the demolition of Falcon Hall/Science South and the construction of the Leggett building? Has a tree schedule, with all the pertinent tree information, been completed that shows those trees that will be removed and those next to the building construction that will be protected. Thank you.

    1. Dear Mr. French,

      Thanks for your inquiry. The College is committed to tree protection in the project area, in general, and will strive to protect the park-like setting along Takoma Avenue. Trees and other landscaping material will be added to the campus as part of the project to help the City with its goals with respect to tree canopy, for aesthetics and screening, to help manage stormwater, and clean the air. The College’s tree plans have been submitted to the City as required regarding tree protection. A fact sheet regarding this subject will be available at the July 9 meeting and online.

      The College is committed to sustainable practices to help ensure the safety, well-being of our students, employees and neighbors, and to help protect the environment we all share.

      Thank you again.

    2. Dear Mr. French,

      Thanks for your inquiry. The College is committed to tree protection in the project area, in general, and will strive to protect the park-like setting along Takoma Avenue. Trees and other landscaping material will be added to the campus as part of the project to help the City with its goals with respect to tree canopy, for aesthetics and screening, to help manage stormwater, and clean the air. The College’s tree plans have been submitted to the City as required regarding tree protection. A fact sheet regarding this subject will be available at the July 9 meeting and online.

      The College is committed to sustainable practices to help ensure the safety, well-being of our students, employees and neighbors, and to help protect the environment we all share.

      Thank you again.

      1. Has a tree schedule, with all the pertinent tree information, been completed yet that shows those trees that will be removed and those next to the building construction that will be protected? If so, please let us know how to access this document. When are the impacted trees scheduled to be removed and others close to the construction protected? Thank you.

  16. Hello…

    With the construction schedule for the new math/science building not being started until near the end of this calendar year, the option to keep useful parts of the existing structure in service for several more months should be seriously considered. Among the facilities that have good public and school usage is the swimming pool that I and numerous others have actively used and enjoyed for physical fitness and recreation for many years. It’s currently scheduled to close on May 24, 2019. Please seriously consider keeping the pool open until it’s absolutely necessary to close it.down, perhaps until year’s end if feasible or, at least, through the summer months of 2019. I and many regular swimmers there will welcome and cheer any such extension of time that the updated construction schedule now allows. Please know that such a move will be enthusiastically welcomed by many local swimmers. And you will not only be providing public benefit to numerous county residents but will extract even more worthwhile usage from this still very serviceable swimming facility. Thank you.

    1. Many of us requested the same of the College when they announced the plan to close Falcon hall on May 24, 2019 without demo/construction plans in place for the new building. The excuse given by the College was that they required the time to remove the salvageable things from the building. It’s with bitterness that we watch a perfectly good pool lie dormant for six months when it could have served students and the community.

      1. Thank you for your continued interest in the project. The timing of the closing of the buildings including Falcon Hall was necessary to meet project milestones to open the Catherine and Isiah Leggett Math and Science Building on time and on budget. Since the building closed, College facility staff have been diligently working to decommission the buildings which is a painstaking task to prepare the buildings for demolition. We must remove furniture, equipment, computers, lab equipment, parts—anything and everything in the buildings that can be reused, recycled, sold as well as appropriately disposed. This effort is virtually complete. As a result, the Barton Malow Company, the College’s construction manager will install a fence around the project perimeter the week of November 11. The project’s website is a wealth of information about the project: http://mcblogs.montgomerycollege.edu/tpss-math-science-building/
        Please attend an upcoming Project Update Forum.

  17. Please leave Falcon Hall open as long as possible before starting demolition. After all, MC has stated numerous times that Elizabeth Square recreational complex in downtown Silver Spring would be “…open before the demolition of Falcon Hall.” Again, MC states construction of this new athletic facility Elizabeth Square will be “…completed in 2019, well before any changes are implemented on the campus.” At least please leave Falcon Hall gym and pool open until the end of 2019! Thank you!

  18. Applicable National, State, and Local Requirements:

    In addition to the Montgomery County building design and review process, the following are a list of building codes and standards that will govern the design of the new math and science building:

    ICC INTERNATIONAL BUILDING CODE 2015 EDITION
    ICC INTERNATIONAL MECHANICAL CODE 2015 EDITION
    IGBC INTERNATIONAL GREEN BUILDING CODE 2015 EDITION
    NFPA 1 FIRE CODE, 2015 EDITION
    NFPA 13 STANDARDS FOR THE INSTALLATION OF SPRINKLER SYSTEMS, 2013 EDITION
    NFPA 14 STANDARDS FOR THE INSTALLATION OF STANDPIPE AND HOSE SYSTEM, 2013 EDITION
    NFPA 72 NATIONAL FIRE ALARM AND SIGNALING CODE, 2013 EDITION
    NFPA 20 STANDARD FOR THE INSTALLATION OF STATIONARY PUMPS FOR FIRE PROTECTION, 2013 EDITION
    NFPA 70 NATIONAL ELECTRICAL CODE, 2014 EDITION
    NFPA 101 LIFE SAFETY CODE, 2015 EDITION

    Non-binding guidelines pertaining to siting and managing the chemistry and biology labs:

    In addition to the above national, state, and local requirements, the college is committed to environmental health and safety as the college is committed to the safety of students, faculty, staff, and neighbors.

    The College places a priority on safety and utilizes appropriate protocols. Established safety programs Include:

    • Classroom and office protocols
    • Consistent materials hygiene and hazard communication
    • Safety for facilities operations and maintenance activities

    Montgomery College’s Environmental Safety Office works to promote a healthy and safe work environment for all members of the College community and, as result, the communities in which the College operates.

    The Environmental Safety Office requires safety training for faculty, staff, and students; provides employee access to Safety Data Sheets for chemical materials; oversees proper disposal of chemical waste; investigates safety complaints; and supports preparation for environmental emergencies that may impact our campuses or our students. College materials are strictly regulated at all levels of government. The Environmental Safety Office administers and oversees compliance with federal and state environmental and occupational regulations. Key regulatory bodies are as follows:

    • OSHA Occupational Safety and Safety Administration
    • MOSH Maryland Occupational Safety and Health
    • EPA Environmental Protection Agency
    • MDE Maryland Department of the Environment
    • WSSC Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission

    The College Contracts with ECOFLO, Inc. for pickup of all chemical waste. ECOFLO is a waste management company that conforms to EPA, DOT, and state regulations.

    How the location selected for the labs in a residential neighborhood complies with the above requirements:

    Currently, the existing science buildings on the Takoma Park/Silver Spring Campus have the same programs as the new building. The new building systems would be a significant upgrade over the existing and would allow the programs to function in a new building that meets contemporary building code.

    The proposed facility will be designed to meet all pertinent regulated codes and standards including all that govern the chemistry and biology labs. The specific details about how this project will respond to each individual code requirement is yet to be finalized, but the design team can assure that the program and scope as proposed can and will comply with all regulatory requirements. In fact, the College has a strong demonstrated record of safety. Labs have been present and safely operated on the Takoma Park/Silver Spring Campus for more than 50 years.

    Regarding the new math and science building, the laboratories on campus are basic instructional labs similar to MCPS labs—no investigative research or commercial activities will occur. At least four MCPS high schools with comparable instructional labs are embedded in residential neighborhoods.

    The College Uses Standard Instructional Lab Materials. Many are common household materials, including:

    • Tylenol – Acetaminophen
    • Ibuprofen- 2-(4-Isobutylphenyl) propanoic acid
    • Hexane – Solvent used in glues and to extract cooking oils, e.g., soybean and canola
    • Helium gas – Often used to inflate balloons at birthday parties
    • Vinegar – Acetic acid
    • Starch
    • Sugars – Sucrose, Glucose
    • Ajax laundry detergent
    • Phosphoric Acid – (Found in sodas)
    • Salts – (A variety of cationic andanionic compounds)
    • Weak to strong acids – (HCL, found in your stomach)
    • Acetone – Nail polish remover

    Such compliance with pertinent codes and standards, as a practical matter, are mandatory project requirements from all parties involved. Compliance is part of the Montgomery County design review process prior to construction of a project. Compliance with these applicable codes and standards is a requirement of Montgomery College as the owner and operator of a facility with many students and faculty. Compliance is a requirement of the design team’s professional ethics as the design team is the architect and engineer of record.

  19. Please identify all applicable national, state and local requirements, and all non-binding guidelines, pertaining to siting and managing the chemistry and biology labs, and analyze in a report whether and how the location selected for the labs in a residential neighborhood complies with these requirements and non-binding guidelines.

    Steps should be taken to minimize traffic on Takoma Ave., including closing off the entrance to the planned parking lot adjacent to Takoma Ave (if an emergency access entrance lane is needed from Takoma Ave., that should be open to only emergency vehicles), and limiting traffic on the stretch of Takoma Ave between Fenton and Philadelphia to local traffic.

    Please explain the traffic flow design for the planned drop-off site on Fenton Ave.

    Thank you,
    David Kaplan

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