Until it crashes before me in a heap, I will be opening and writing on my laptop many more times.  I will only be writing on it for the Potomac Review’s blog, however, this last time.

One semester has spanned between my nervous interview with Professor Wakeman-Linn and now, and in that time I interned with the Potomac Review.  What does that mean?  It means I logged database hours, and stuffing envelope hours.  It means I sat many Monday nights in a room with a table so large it almost squeezed the few people in the room out the door.

It means that Monday nights turned from smeary and dreary to funny and sunny.  An after glow from Potomac Review meetings lasted me the whole (very long, very jumpy) bus ride home.  I learned about submissions so good they knock you off from the edge of that ginormous table, and I learned about reading those submissions with people even more extraordinary than the extraordinary literary magazine they produce.

I learned about a term called face-meltingly-good, invented by a graduated intern I haven’t met but have heard about.

While in all my other classes the professors have mandatorily preached against plagiarism, and the no-copying rule has long been drilled in my head, it is a good thing Potomac Review Internship doesn’t have a profile on ratemyprofessors.com because if it did, all I would be able to put in description of the internship is face-meltingly-good.  Even if it constitutes phrase copying, it’s the only honest to goodness face melting truth.