An over abundance of pizza, envelopes, rejection slips, and paper cuts. The vast majority of the writers entered into our submissions database receive letters regretting to inform your work was read with great interest, but is not quite right for our publication.

As to whatever heartbreak occurs on the receiving end of these letters, is, miraculously, thankfully, no concern of us interns. There is justice, though: as writers, we also receive rejection letters on a regular basis (actually, I should talk only for myself – my rejection letter collection is impressive, look out for the pile of pink and white slips bearing my name and crinkled with my tears on Ebay when I am famous) – and besides, our tongues swell up and turn green from licking all the poisonous envelope juices.

The real point is the submissions that shower down on us every day. If I was in a whiny mood, I would probably say that office work is boring and annoying and why the heck do we even bother and can’t these writers just not get rejection letters and they will get a free copy if they are published anyway and, if they don’t get the copies they know they will not have been published and wouldn’t that be so much easier.

But the truth is, I love sorting and cataloguing entries. I feel closest to other newbie writers like me every time I peek through a package filled with someone else’s writing embryos, someone else’s cover letter that is waiting to say “has appeared or is forthcoming in…”