Julie, our fearless leader and Chief Editor, ran into Stephen Corey at AWP and invited him to speak his mind, tell us the ways of his Magazine Award winning Georgia Review, and generally hang out for a little bit.

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The most intriguing part was the fact that they spend the majority of their time working with the author after the piece has been accepted. We at the Potomac Review do that a little, but to hear him recount the percentage of time Georgia Review takes in perfecting a piece is really something to admire and strive for. They do have 2 full time employees who read for Georgia Review, which helps. But all in all it was a great afternoon last week.

Also, I’d like to point out a great article that Matthew Zapruder wrote about redefining poetry critics and their critique. It’s food for thought.

-Will