Current Features

Unfinished Business

Unfinished Business

Few people are comfortable talking about death—let alone preparing for it. But procrastination doesn’t do any good, says author, speaker, and funeral planning expert Gail Rubin ’78. Through her radio talk shows, books, blogs, and speaking events, Rubin helps people start conversations about the taboo topic. “Just as talking about sex won’t make you pregnant,” […]

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Downsize and Organize for a Better Life—and a Better Death

Downsize and Organize for a Better Life—and a Better Death

5 Tips on What You Need to Know to Save Money, Time, and Sanity 1. Empty storage units. Did you rent a storage unit to “temporarily” store some must-keep items that didn’t have a place in your home? Take a hard look at what’s in those units. Are those items even worth the rent? Clear […]

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NASA, We Have a Problem

NASA, We Have a Problem

In the small, well-lit corner lab, Lyudmyla Panashchenko ’05 places a capacitor into the Zeiss scanning electron microscope, or SEM, and closes the chamber. When she activates it, the SEM will pump the chamber with the sample down to a vacuum and trace a focused electron beam over the sample and generate a high resolution […]

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Veteran Police Officer Takes Top Security Position

Veteran Police Officer Takes Top Security Position

In August 2015, the College hired Ms. Shawn Harrison as the director of public safety and emergency management. A 35-year veteran of law enforcement, she spent the first 26 years at the Baltimore City Police Department in various capacities including patrol, sexual assault and child abuse investigator, internal affairs, police academy instructor, and executive protection […]

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Cartoonist Richard Thompson Made Us Laugh

Cartoonist Richard Thompson Made Us Laugh

The award-winning cartoonist Richard Thompson, widely known for his syndicated comic strip Cul de Sac and Richard’s Poor Almanac cartoons, died of complications from Parkinson’s Disease on July 27, 2016. This is personal. I knew and loved Richard Thompson long before he became famous. We worked together on the staff of The Spur, the student […]

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Artist in Residence Raj Bunnag

Artist in Residence Raj Bunnag

When Raj Bunnag ’07 was young he doodled constantly—in notebooks, on his school papers, on anything in reach. Later, as an art student at Montgomery College, he honed printmaking skills—drawing, carving, inking, and using various methods to reproduce his doodles, which, by then, were conceptual and elaborate designs. “Raj was one of those students I’d […]

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The Music Man

The Music Man

In February 2015, listeners  to NPR’s Jazz Night in America got a taste of something Washington, DC, jazz lovers have enjoyed for years: the innovative sound of trombonist Reginald Cyntje. Cyntje was taking a risk when he stood center stage in the Bohemian Caverns that January night and blew the first baritone notes on his […]

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House of Blair

House of Blair

Students at the Takoma Park/Silver Spring Campus amble past it, generally paying more attention to their cell phones than the architecture. Georgia Avenue traffic motors past it, coughing out carbon monoxide alongside it. Birds perch atop it, eyeing the old-growth trees and park visitors nearby. With time and vacancy, the old house at 900 Jesup […]

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Sole  Searching

Sole Searching

Pictographs unearthed at the tomb of Ankhmahor, a physician around 2330 BC, show two seated men receiving massages on their hands and feet. Could the ancient Egyptians have been the first practitioners of the pain-relieving—and stress-reducing—remedy known as reflexology? Reflexologists work from maps of pressure points on the feet and hands, which, in theory, will […]

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Sedimental Journey Down the Mississippi

Sedimental Journey Down the Mississippi

Crops are the bread and butter of Minnesota’s economy. Its 81,000 farms, the second-largest employer in the state, rank third in the nation for soybean production and fourth for corn. Unfortunately, with regard to the impact on water quality, what happens in Minnesota doesn’t stay in Minnesota. Because its interconnected waterways join the mighty Mississippi […]

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