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How MC Students Are Transitioning To Online Classes

In early March, the College community was asked to join fellow Marylanders in working and studying at home for at least a couple weeks. More than a month later, with stay-at-home orders still in place, MC students have adjusted to the new normal – a college life online, referred to as remote learning. Like most, they (and their professors) have discovered new ways to learn, complete assignments, and carry on with a spring semester like none other.

Montgomery College Student John Arango

“While most of my classes at MC have been moved online, the professor for my Figure Drawing class is trying very hard to keep everyone engaged,” said Montgomery College student Arleen Seed. “The course is all about drawing from a live model, and doing this for five hours a week, which is easy when you have class, is difficult to duplicate at home.”

Seed added that “[the professor’s] assignments are very helpful in keeping me on track. I don’t get there every day, but trying to stick to a schedule is helping a lot,” talking about the importance of trying to maintain a daily schedule as close to normal as possible.

The global COVID-19 pandemic is forcing millions of people to experience conditions that have only been read about in history books. From shortages at supermarkets, requirements to wear masks in public places, and daily reports of rising hospitalizations, fear is one of the most unsettling aspects of this new existence.

“I’ve been trying to fight fear by learning all that I can about this disease, keeping a routine, setting daily goals, and then trying to concentrate on accomplishing them,” Seed said.

John Arango, also an MC student, said he has been trying to find ways to prevent boredom during this time: “Sitting on your butt at home is saving lives, so you might as well make the most of it.” Arango is playing video games, such as Spider-Man, and watching Game of Thrones.

I’ve been trying to fight fear by learning all that I can about this disease, keeping a routine, setting daily goals, and then trying to concentrate on accomplishing them

Another Montgomery College student, Madlené Nel, said most of her classes, such as dance, normally require that she physically attend. Her professor has been working with her and other students so they can make videos and submit them.

Montgomery College student Madlene Nel

Montgomery College Student Madlené Nel

“I want to say thank you to all of the professors who have helped us with the transition to online classes, and have given us a chance to succeed this semester,” Nel said.

One of the common themes among the Montgomery College students interviewed: they are all thankful to a professor, or two, or three, who have helped make the transition to remote learning as smooth as possible.

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